A day at Plew Farm

What is a typical day at Plew Farm?  Although the days here at the farm aren’t always the same – we wanted to share with you what a typical day involves.

Our day begins at 5:00am twice a week, 5:30am four times a week – and on Sunday mornings, we wake to ‘no alarm Sunday’ (which usually means we are awake & up by 5:35).  We lease farm land 5 miles from home – and these early morning drives to the farm are quite enjoyable.  We saw a moose on someone’s lawn last week!

The morning farm chores include (but are not limited to!), feeding the laying hens, the pigs and the meat birds.  The meat birds are in chicken tractors, which are movable bottomless pens.  We move these tractors every morning and every night – giving the the birds access to fresh pasture, bugs and what not.  The steers are usually grazing in their pasture – but occaisionally one of them will have slipped under the fence and will require attention from us to get him back in.

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Meat birds in the chicken tractor

 Back at the house – we have baby chicks, who need feeding and moving as well.  These chicks will graduate to the farm at about 2-3 weeks of age.

Kevin, who works full-time in Rutland, begins his work day at 6:30.  Patti spends her day eating bon-bons and watching I Love Lucy reruns …. Just Kidding!!  Patti’s day is filled with gardening and yard-work, making deliveries, baking, preparing for 4 farmers markets, sales & marketing and housework (although housework seems to fall at the bottom of the list!)

Evening chores begin around 5pm – and are the same as our morning chores, with the exception of the steers.  The steers are moved daily to new pasture, which is called rotational grazing.  Rotational grazing encourages an even distribution of grazing throughout a paddock, allowing resting periods in between rotations that help maintain the health of the pasture.  Each evening a new ‘paddock’ is created, and the steers stroll into their new area.  It’s really quite impressive the way they follow Kevin from paddock to paddock.

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The steers enjoying dinner!

Other chores that fill in our days consist of:  building/repairing fences, getting ready for the haying season, processing chickens, building a barn, garden projects, and more!  We are generally done for the day around 7:30pm – except when haying season starts …. !

We love what we do – we don’t consider farming ‘work’ – it is simply our lifestyle.  Each day at Plew Farm is an adventure, an adventure we love.

Dedicated to providing a local alternative to commercially produced factory food